It’s the day after Labor Day, which can mean only one thing (well, other than post-vacation malaise): it’s back to school time! We’re dedicating this week’s posts to one of our favorite childhood memories—school lunches. This World War II-era poster from the Records of the Office of Government Reports promotes the adoption of school lunch programs.

It’s the day after Labor Day, which can mean only one thing (well, other than post-vacation malaise): it’s back to school time! We’re dedicating this week’s posts to one of our favorite childhood memories—school lunches. This World War II-era poster from the Records of the Office of Government Reports promotes the adoption of school lunch programs.

I noticed on the farms, mostly the little ones with just a shack for a house, there seems to be no one but the women left to do the work. You see them taking care of cattle, etc. It makes me proud to see how the women have picked up where the men left off and are keeping the home fires burning.
Mabel Opal Miller to Pvt. Ivan Johnson; letter of September 6, 1944.
Frugal Friday
For those with a sweet tooth in the 1940s, strict sugar rations put a damper on dessert time. As a part of the campaign to ration foods in during World War II, the government showed the public how to make dessert for 6 people—using only a ¼ cup of sugar. I wonder what the mystery dessert was…

Frugal Friday

For those with a sweet tooth in the 1940s, strict sugar rations put a damper on dessert time. As a part of the campaign to ration foods in during World War II, the government showed the public how to make dessert for 6 people—using only a ¼ cup of sugar. I wonder what the mystery dessert was…

Frugal Friday
Food was just as valuable as ammunition in wartime America. To encourage rationing and discourage waste, the US ran a variety of print, radio and community campaigns featuring “Scuttlebutt Sam.” In this poster, Sam warns against a badge which designated its wearer as a “first class food waster.” You could help the war effort by clearing your plate.

Frugal Friday

Food was just as valuable as ammunition in wartime America. To encourage rationing and discourage waste, the US ran a variety of print, radio and community campaigns featuring “Scuttlebutt Sam.” In this poster, Sam warns against a badge which designated its wearer as a “first class food waster.” You could help the war effort by clearing your plate.

“This Nazi officer is eating his words, and a can of C-rations, in the ruins of Saarbrucken.” 
C-Rations contained meat, vegetables, sugar, crackers, and coffee for World War II soldiers to “enjoy” while in combat. The US used surplus C-rations during the Korean and Vietnam war. Today, the meals are known as MCI’s—Meal, Combat, Individual.

“This Nazi officer is eating his words, and a can of C-rations, in the ruins of Saarbrucken.”

C-Rations contained meat, vegetables, sugar, crackers, and coffee for World War II soldiers to “enjoy” while in combat. The US used surplus C-rations during the Korean and Vietnam war. Today, the meals are known as MCI’s—Meal, Combat, Individual.