President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Day of Infamy Speech, 12/08/194

Item from Records of the U.S. Senate. (03/04/1789 -)

President Franklin Roosevelt made this speech in response to the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. It begins with the iconic words, “—a date which will live in infamy,” and ends with his signature.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DEvJ

Artist J. Theodore Johnson created this 1937 mural of farmers for the Works Progress Administration—an organization created to employ millions of Americans to carry out public works projects. A great deal of these projects were aimed at promoting American art and culture with the hope they would give more Americans access to what President Franklin Roosevelt described as “an abundant life.”
You can learn more about the New Deal arts projects in the online exhibition “A New Deal for the Arts.”

Artist J. Theodore Johnson created this 1937 mural of farmers for the Works Progress Administration—an organization created to employ millions of Americans to carry out public works projects. A great deal of these projects were aimed at promoting American art and culture with the hope they would give more Americans access to what President Franklin Roosevelt described as “an abundant life.”

You can learn more about the New Deal arts projects in the online exhibition “A New Deal for the Arts.”

“All people have … a vital interest in food.”

On June 7, 1943 Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the delegates of the United Nations Conference on Food and Agriculture. He praised all those in attendance for their commitment to and diligence in assessing the global food supplies. Their work garnered information on the world’s ability to provide for all its citizens and what could be done to repair any discrepancies. Read through the address and see how Roosevelt thought food reform would help economies and morale.

And all people have, in the literal sense of the word, a vital interest in food. That a child or an adult should get the nourishment necessary for full health is too important all over the world—too important a thing to be left to mere chance.