US National Archives Exhibits

Oct 01

Affidavit of Ngim Ah Oy Filed with the United States Consulate in Hong Kong.
Item From: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. (03/17/1939).
The 23 year old Lee Puey You sought to escape a war-torn China by emigrating to San Francisco on April 13, 1939 under the alias of Ngim Ah-Oy. Her original plan was to marry the 53 year old ‘widower’ Woo Tong, but she was detained by immigration officials for three days who were suspicious of her story. She spent an additional 20 months at Angel Island while her ‘family’ appealed her case all the way to the Supreme Court.
She was deported in 1940, but was able to gain entry to the US in 1947 following the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Acts. She sought to marry Woo Tong again, only to find that his first wife was still alive. She was forced into a state of servitude for the couple until Woo died in 1950.
After Woo’s demise, she was free to both meet and marry Fred Gin. They lived in harmony for a 5 years, bearing 4 children. However, this period of bliss was cut short in 1955 when she was again investigated for entering the country illegally. Lee confessed to using forged documents, and was ordered to be deported. Fortunately, this time her appeals were successful and she became a full U.S. citizen in 1959.
Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/6587585

Affidavit of Ngim Ah Oy Filed with the United States Consulate in Hong Kong.

Item From: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. (03/17/1939).

The 23 year old Lee Puey You sought to escape a war-torn China by emigrating to San Francisco on April 13, 1939 under the alias of Ngim Ah-Oy. Her original plan was to marry the 53 year old ‘widower’ Woo Tong, but she was detained by immigration officials for three days who were suspicious of her story. She spent an additional 20 months at Angel Island while her ‘family’ appealed her case all the way to the Supreme Court.

She was deported in 1940, but was able to gain entry to the US in 1947 following the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Acts. She sought to marry Woo Tong again, only to find that his first wife was still alive. She was forced into a state of servitude for the couple until Woo died in 1950.

After Woo’s demise, she was free to both meet and marry Fred Gin. They lived in harmony for a 5 years, bearing 4 children. However, this period of bliss was cut short in 1955 when she was again investigated for entering the country illegally. Lee confessed to using forged documents, and was ordered to be deported. Fortunately, this time her appeals were successful and she became a full U.S. citizen in 1959.

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/6587585

Sep 30

[video]

Sep 29

Gossip Blend Coffee Label
Item From: Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. (1925- 1975)
After the passage of the Pure Food and Drugs Act, companies used their labels to declare the purity of their products’ ingredients. However, they never had to specify what those ingredients actually were. The general public was unable to verify which ingredients were in their coffee until 1965 ,when manufacturers were legally obligated to list them.
Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/5713885

Gossip Blend Coffee Label

Item From: Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. (1925- 1975)

After the passage of the Pure Food and Drugs Act, companies used their labels to declare the purity of their products’ ingredients. However, they never had to specify what those ingredients actually were. The general public was unable to verify which ingredients were in their coffee until 1965 ,when manufacturers were legally obligated to list them.

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/5713885

Map of the Panama Canal Zone, 08/01/1920
Item From: Records of the Panama Canal. (04/07/1849-1951)
This map comes from a series of maps and drawings pertaining to the construction of the Panama Canal by the Panama Canal Company and the preceding properties associated with French-owned Isthmian Canal Commission. This Map details the measurements (width, length, and depth) of the Canal, as well as the costs that the Canal incurred during the various periods of its construction.
Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/6861830

Map of the Panama Canal Zone, 08/01/1920

Item From: Records of the Panama Canal. (04/07/1849-1951)

This map comes from a series of maps and drawings pertaining to the construction of the Panama Canal by the Panama Canal Company and the preceding properties associated with French-owned Isthmian Canal Commission. This Map details the measurements (width, length, and depth) of the Canal, as well as the costs that the Canal incurred during the various periods of its construction.

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/6861830

Sep 27

[video]

Sep 26

[video]

Sep 24

Benjamin Franklin at the Court of France.
Item From: Records of the Commission of Fine Arts. (1910-)
Benjamin Franklin’s diplomacy within the French court played a crucial role in securing France’s support for the American Revolution. This print shows Benjamin Franklin receiving a laurel wreath upon his head surrounded by assembled members of the French court. Some notable members  in this print [from left to right] are the Princesse Lamballe holding flowers, Diana Polignac presenting the wreath, the Comte de Vergennes, Madame Campan, Marie-Antoinette, and Louis XVI.
Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/518217

Benjamin Franklin at the Court of France.

Item From: Records of the Commission of Fine Arts. (1910-)

Benjamin Franklin’s diplomacy within the French court played a crucial role in securing France’s support for the American Revolution. This print shows Benjamin Franklin receiving a laurel wreath upon his head surrounded by assembled members of the French court. Some notable membersĀ  in this print [from left to right] are the Princesse Lamballe holding flowers, Diana Polignac presenting the wreath, the Comte de Vergennes, Madame Campan, Marie-Antoinette, and Louis XVI.

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/518217

Sep 23

[video]

Sep 22

Childhood Drawing of a Sailing Ship by Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Item From: Roosevelt Family Papers Donated by the Children. (1882-1945)
This 1887 drawing was made by Franklin D. Roosevelt when he was 5 years and 11 months old. It accompanied a letter that he addressed to his mother, “My dear mama we coasted yesterday nothing dangerous yet, look out for tomorrow!! your boy, F”. It is fitting that he drew a ship to send to his mother, given his future actions as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy during World War I.
Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/198134

Childhood Drawing of a Sailing Ship by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Item From: Roosevelt Family Papers Donated by the Children. (1882-1945)

This 1887 drawing was made by Franklin D. Roosevelt when he was 5 years and 11 months old. It accompanied a letter that he addressed to his mother, “My dear mama we coasted yesterday nothing dangerous yet, look out for tomorrow!! your boy, F”. It is fitting that he drew a ship to send to his mother, given his future actions as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy during World War I.

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/198134

Sep 21

Application for Seaman’s Protection Certificate, 03/07/1934.
Item From: Records of the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation. (1936- 1942)
Seaman Protection Papers a.k.a. “Protection Papers” were issued to American seaman from the late 18th century into the first half of the 20th century. These certificates served to demonstrate American Citizenship and protect them from being impressed into another country’s service while in international waters.
Source: http://go.usa.gov/DEAA

Application for Seaman’s Protection Certificate, 03/07/1934.

Item From: Records of the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation. (1936- 1942)

Seaman Protection Papers a.k.a. “Protection Papers” were issued to American seaman from the late 18th century into the first half of the 20th century. These certificates served to demonstrate American Citizenship and protect them from being impressed into another country’s service while in international waters.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DEAA