US National Archives Exhibits

Jul 22

[video]

Jul 21

[video]

Jul 20

Photograph of Neil Armstrong on the Moon.
Item From: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (01/1967-02/17/1973).
Happy Moon Day!  Today we celebrate the first man to make his mark on the moon! Neil Armstrong’s famous epigram “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind” actually was not pre-planned in advance as other astronauts had done, and he only thought up the phrase after they successfully touched down on the lunar surface. 
Source: http://go.usa.gov/jRdP

Photograph of Neil Armstrong on the Moon.

Item From: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (01/1967-02/17/1973).

Happy Moon Day!  Today we celebrate the first man to make his mark on the moon! Neil Armstrong’s famous epigram “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind” actually was not pre-planned in advance as other astronauts had done, and he only thought up the phrase after they successfully touched down on the lunar surface. 

Source: http://go.usa.gov/jRdP

Jul 19

Acknowledgement of service obligation signed by Elvis Presley on March 24, 1958, to indicate that he understands that his total service obligation (both active and reserve) is 6 years., 03/24/1958 - 03/24/1958.
Item From: Records of the Army Staff. (12/08/1988-10/01/2003).
Power of the Pen.This document reads, “I , Elvis Aron Presley, having been inducted into the Armed Services of the United States on this 24th Day of March 1958, for 2 years Active Duty, acknowledge that I have been informed of my service obligation”. Elvis chose to enlist with the regular soldiers, instead of with the Special Services to entertain the troops. This decision won over a lot of older Americans who had been initially very critical of him.
Source: http://go.usa.gov/DEdF

Acknowledgement of service obligation signed by Elvis Presley on March 24, 1958, to indicate that he understands that his total service obligation (both active and reserve) is 6 years., 03/24/1958 - 03/24/1958.

Item From: Records of the Army Staff. (12/08/1988-10/01/2003).

Power of the Pen.This document reads, “I , Elvis Aron Presley, having been inducted into the Armed Services of the United States on this 24th Day of March 1958, for 2 years Active Duty, acknowledge that I have been informed of my service obligation”. Elvis chose to enlist with the regular soldiers, instead of with the Special Services to entertain the troops. This decision won over a lot of older Americans who had been initially very critical of him.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DEdF

Jul 16

Act of July 16, 1790 (D.C. Residency Act), 1 STAT 130, which established the District of Columbia as the seat of government., 07/16/1790 - 07/16/1790.
Item From: General Records of the United States Government.(04/01/1985).
The District of Columbia was founded today! Here is the document, signed by then Vice President John Adams, that established the District of Columbia as the seat of the federal government. The federal government was situated in New York City when this bill was passed, after previously being housed in several other locations such as Annapolis and Philadelphia.
Source:http://go.usa.gov/DXtm

Act of July 16, 1790 (D.C. Residency Act), 1 STAT 130, which established the District of Columbia as the seat of government., 07/16/1790 - 07/16/1790.

Item From: General Records of the United States Government.(04/01/1985).

The District of Columbia was founded today! Here is the document, signed by then Vice President John Adams, that established the District of Columbia as the seat of the federal government. The federal government was situated in New York City when this bill was passed, after previously being housed in several other locations such as Annapolis and Philadelphia.

Source:http://go.usa.gov/DXtm

Photograph of President Truman signing S. 591, the Red Cross Reorganization Bill, at his desk in the Oval Office, as Chairman Basil O’Connor of the American Red Cross and Howard Bonham look on., 05/08/1947. 
Item From: Audiovisual Collection. (04/01/1985).
Power of the Pen. Here is President Truman the American Red Cross Reorganization Bill. The fifth amendment, which was passed by Congress on 05/08/1947, did away with the Central Committee and the Board of Incorporators and replaced them with a 50-member Board of Governors. An executive committee consisting of always at least eleven Governors was also created to exercise the powers of the Board when it was not in session.
Source: http://go.usa.gov/jt29

Photograph of President Truman signing S. 591, the Red Cross Reorganization Bill, at his desk in the Oval Office, as Chairman Basil O’Connor of the American Red Cross and Howard Bonham look on., 05/08/1947. 

Item From: Audiovisual Collection. (04/01/1985).

Power of the Pen. Here is President Truman the American Red Cross Reorganization Bill. The fifth amendment, which was passed by Congress on 05/08/1947, did away with the Central Committee and the Board of Incorporators and replaced them with a 50-member Board of Governors. An executive committee consisting of always at least eleven Governors was also created to exercise the powers of the Board when it was not in session.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/jt29

Jul 15

Patent Drawing for J. H. and A. Hughs’ Cow Bell Strap, 12/19/1871.
Item From: Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. (1849-1925).
Patent Spotlight at the National Archives. Today is Cow Appreciation Day! The earliest cow bells we know of date back to the 3rd Millennium BC in Neolithic China. These early cow bells were instrumental in keeping track of livestock and revolutionized the practice of herding. In certain cultures these ostensibly simple accessories can vary in sound, size, and shape. The tonal differences in these bells can identify an animal’s species, age, and gender. Given their international success, it is no surprise that we have continued to refine this remarkable invention.
Source:http://go.usa.gov/jHSH

Patent Drawing for J. H. and A. Hughs’ Cow Bell Strap, 12/19/1871.

Item From: Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. (1849-1925).

Patent Spotlight at the National Archives. Today is Cow Appreciation Day! The earliest cow bells we know of date back to the 3rd Millennium BC in Neolithic China. These early cow bells were instrumental in keeping track of livestock and revolutionized the practice of herding. In certain cultures these ostensibly simple accessories can vary in sound, size, and shape. The tonal differences in these bells can identify an animal’s species, age, and gender. Given their international success, it is no surprise that we have continued to refine this remarkable invention.

Source:http://go.usa.gov/jHSH

Jul 14

Bastille Day - 1920, 07/14/1920.
Item From: Records of the U.S. Senate. (1789-2011).
Today is France’s Independence Day known as Bastille Day. The cartoonist is showing America’s support of France during World War I. The iconic Bastille was a Parisian Fortress that had been repurposed into a state prison. At the time of the revolution the fortress held only eight prisoners, one of which was the infamous Marquis de Sade. The Bastille attracted the ire of the Revolution due to its status as the last bastion of Royalist power in Paris, the strategic value of its artillery and gunpowder, and its symbolic association with the abuses of the ancien régime. 
Source: http://go.usa.gov/DXMz

Bastille Day - 1920, 07/14/1920.

Item From: Records of the U.S. Senate. (1789-2011).

Today is France’s Independence Day known as Bastille Day. The cartoonist is showing America’s support of France during World War I. The iconic Bastille was a Parisian Fortress that had been repurposed into a state prison. At the time of the revolution the fortress held only eight prisoners, one of which was the infamous Marquis de Sade. The Bastille attracted the ire of the Revolution due to its status as the last bastion of Royalist power in Paris, the strategic value of its artillery and gunpowder, and its symbolic association with the abuses of the ancien régime

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DXMz

Jul 13

Drawing for a Game Board, 01/05/1904.
Item From: Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. (1975-).
Patent Spotlight from the National Archives. In its original iteration, ‘Monopoly' was called The Landlord’s Game. It was designed by Elizabeth ‘Lizzie” Magie, and was intended to illustrate the economic impact of Ricardo’s Law of Economic rent and the Georgist concept of a single tax on land value. It was intended to demonstrate how rents served to enrich landlords at the tenants’ expense.
In later versions of the game the land value tax was removed in favor of what came to be known as Auction Monopoly. In this form of the game any unowned property was immediately auctioned off to all game players after being landed on.  
Source:http://go.usa.gov/jH7J

Drawing for a Game Board, 01/05/1904.

Item From: Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. (1975-).

Patent Spotlight from the National Archives. In its original iteration, ‘Monopoly' was called The Landlord’s Game. It was designed by Elizabeth ‘Lizzie” Magie, and was intended to illustrate the economic impact of Ricardo’s Law of Economic rent and the Georgist concept of a single tax on land value. It was intended to demonstrate how rents served to enrich landlords at the tenants’ expense.

In later versions of the game the land value tax was removed in favor of what came to be known as Auction Monopoly. In this form of the game any unowned property was immediately auctioned off to all game players after being landed on.  

Source:http://go.usa.gov/jH7J

Jul 12

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